I love church. Church feels as much like home as my own kitchen. Sometimes it’s an absolute mess, but that usually means something fantastic is cooking!  As a young man who believed in Jesus and who was gay, I had two choices when it came to being a part of a church. I could either become not-gay (or by default stay hidden in a closet of shame and secrecy) or not go to church. Within the past few decades, LGBTQ people of faith have found a third option in open and affirming churches and I’m thankful. These 3 options have also played out when allies, friends, and family of LGBTQ people find themselves veering toward affirmation and inclusion.

Today, I find myself wondering if there is more. What if we as the Church, the body of Christ, his bride, could lovingly, thoughtfully, and graciously wrestle through these important realities together? What if LGBTQ people and our friends, family, and/or allies could “come out” authentically within the community of believers we call our local church? What if the desire for conversation, relationship, love, and the gospel trumped fear, accusation, whispering, and division? What if we chose to live in the tension for the sake of relationship and the gospel?

I don’t go to a perfect church, but it is my church. It’s a place where I have exposed my weaknesses, wept openly, argued passionately, used profanity in heated small meetings with other leaders, been loved through the worst of times, and supported when we didn’t know where or when the next paycheck would come. At our church we’ve been prayed for, cared for, and loved deeply. In turn, we’ve given to, prayed for, cared for, and loved others. We believe there is no more important truth to understand than to know how much our good Father loves us, to fully receive that love, and from there love him and others to the best of our ability.

This video is my most recent message at my church and shares much of the struggle I mentioned.  My hope is that it conveys how burdensome such tension can be—but how worth it living in the tension within ones community is.

I love both my church and the greater Church and I have tremendous hope that, as the Church, we are becoming all we were created to be. I love that my church is choosing love, relationship, and conversation for the sake of the Gospel and people. That’s real life. That’s maturity. That’s grace.

Speaking at Washington National Cathedral During DC Pride Weekend (2 Videos)

I had the honor of joining the Washington National Cathedral for the celebration of Holy Eucharist on the fourth Sunday after Pentecost (this past Sunday). It was a very difficult morning with the breaking news of the massacre in our home town. Even so, I hope you are encouraged by the message. The first video is the sermon and the second video is a Q&A we did with the congregation. The transcript of the first video is at the end of this post.

Good Morning. It is a tremendous honor to be standing in the Canterbury Pulpit as the guest preacher for 2016 Pride Weekend.

For those of you who know me and my story, you too, know this is truly momentous.

Special thanks to Bishop Budde, Ruth Frey, my friend, Kevin Eckstrom, and all of the Cathedral staff for this rare gift.

Thank you, members of the Cathedral for allowing me to share with you this morning.

Thank you to the LGBTQ+ community for welcoming Leslie and me both to this weekend and to the community.

We do not take your friendship lightly.

Many have speculated about the reasons Leslie and I have for being here this weekend.

Some say it is to advance our own agenda—that we are seeking to remain relevant.

Some say we are preaching the same old message but in a nicer way.

Others say we are here promoting a new agenda—Y’all know….THE GAY AGENDA.

I must confess being here is difficult because of the push and pull we feel from all sides and from the diverse chosen communities of people we call family.

Today we joyfully stand with one of our chosen tribes—people we hold dear—people who in the push and pull have embraced us as we are.

The truth is we do have an agenda.

Because we believe through faith in Christ, we, whose sins are many, have the forgiveness of sin and guilt and shame,

Because we believe we are justified by faith in Christ and not through works of the flesh,

Because we believe we have been crucified with Christ and have new life though we remain in this suit of flesh,

Because we believe Christ’s life and death served a purpose and is not nullified,

Our agenda is to follow HIS commands: To love God and to love people.

Admittedly, that agenda appears passive to people who want clear answers or position statements or who want me to wear any number of labels.

Conversely, to demonstrate love in certain arenas feels aggressive to those who believe we have succumbed to an errant theology; a sloppy grace, unreflective of Christ.

But, this is our choice. Our life.

It’s true—we have fallen prey to grace and it has wrecked us.

It is messy, sloppy, and troublesome, but we have found it is the only key that unlocks the prison of legalistic religion and set the captive truly free.

True, we are here to support and celebrate the gift of living in a society where people are free to live outside of the dark, frightening, and lonely closets in which they’ve been imprisoned whether for short or long periods of time.

True, we celebrate and honor the amazing families who have finally been given the legal recognition they deserve.

True, and most importantly, this morning we celebrate as members of one body, The Church, and as a remnant hoping the diversity we have in this House this morning will lead others in our body to open their Houses of Worship to ALL, as well.

As was the case in the first Pride weekend in June 1970 on the streets of midtown Manhattan, we are here to celebrate a growing movement of honesty, transparency, and pride.

Shame is an antonym for pride. And, we’ve had enough of shame.

Leslie and I are also here to celebrate our story—that of our family of 4. Our 10 and 11 year olds, Molly and Isaac are attending our home church today in the greater Orlando area.

We are here to celebrate the minority of others, like us, who don’t fit the narrative of many gay families.

We are here to make amends to people who’ve been hurt by sexual orientation change efforts like our friends Q, Michael, Chris, and others.

We are here to honor friends like Jill, Amy, Don, and others who, because of their faith convictions, have chosen to remain celibate.

We are here to reunite with dear friends like Julie who in embracing her sexuality has found peace in the embrace of God.

We stand here NOT as people plugged into the Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil — pointing to one story as good and another as evil.

We stand here NOT as people whose moral pendulum has swung from one side to another, but rather as people who are joyfully and irrevocably plugged into the Tree of Life seeing people as God sees them: redeemed, holy, blameless, righteous, and beautiful.

Our pendulum has fallen off its axis never to swing again.

And our hearts have expanded to include a community of people we once felt in opposition to and estranged from.

We are here for reconciliation and relationship.

Most importantly, Leslie and I are here to promote the amazing grace—Kairos—Charis of a really good Father.

Along the road we’ve traveled we encountered a pure gospel—THE Good News.

That gospel—THE Gospel—illumined the narrative of our Good Father who gave his only Son to be radically EXcluded, marginalized, cast aside, tortured, and executed so that all of humanity could finally be radically INcluded once and for all—included in a Kingdom that would never end.

The only Kingdom that ever has or ever will matter. Allowing all of us to be adopted into the family of a King who will reign forever and who willingly bestows on his children every good and perfect gift.

Sadly, many of us who found ourselves recipients of this amazing deal—this amazing adoption—have twisted the Gospel and made it exclusionary.

We’ve mixed in the Law and referred to it as THE TRUTH. But, Jesus fulfilled the Law through his death, burial, and resurrection. Grace came through his ultimate and unparalleled sacrifice.

We’ve demanded that grace without the truth of the Law is sloppy, hyper, slippery, greasy, CHEAP.

But, cheap grace, like cheap super-glue is the kind that does not withstand the elements.

It falters under pressure. It fails.

God’s grace—his infinite unconditional and unmerited love—never fails, never falters, never stops working or holding—no matter what comes its way.

It is all-inclusive and, because it cost him everything, is the antithesis of cheap.

God’s grace is lavish. Priceless. Free to all.

The TRUTH is, God is full of GRACE.

I once led the largest organization in the world dedicated to proclaiming freedom from homosexuality through the power of Jesus Christ. I did so with the best of intentions.

My goal was to educate churches and make them safe places for LGBTQ+ people, and unfortunately, to help those churches convert LGBTQ+ people—to help them change.

My stated objective was to put Exodus International out of business because the Church was doing its job.

Three years ago this week, ironically, I stood on a stage at our 38th Annual Exodus Conference and announced Exodus was shutting down.

I repented publicly—I changed my mind.

That night, I amended the statement I’d lived by all 12 years of my presidency to this, “Exodus must go out of business so the Church can do its job.”

My beliefs about the church’s job had been altered, too.

Today, I believe the job of the Church is to continue the work and ministry of Jesus.

To love and serve others, to be radically inclusive even at the expense of comfort and understanding. To proclaim the pure Gospel.

The job of Christians and Christian leaders isn’t to usurp the roles of God, Savior, and Holy Spirit.

It isn’t to condemn—Jesus was the ONLY perfect human being who ever lived on planet Earth.

The apostle John states that Jesus didn’t come to condemn but to save.

It was Jesus, after all, who in the story read this morning from the book of Luke, rebuked Simon the Pharisee and showed favor to the prostitute who gave all she had out of a pure heart.

So, then, why do we condemn? Why do we judge? Why do we exclude?

I wonder if we – and by we, I mean those of us who call ourselves Christ followers and have condemned, judged, and excluded – have allowed fear to rule us.

Fear of the unknown, fear of that which is different—other.

Do I dare say – fear that God’s angry judgment would rain down on us like it did in the Old Testament story of Sodom and Gomorrah?  A story I believe we have gotten terribly, terribly wrong.

If I’ve learned anything in the last few years, it is NOT to fear.

I don’t know that I’m brave, but I am convinced I’m a child of a really good God.

I am convinced that HIS perfect love, demonstrated in the life of Jesus— who is the Tree of Life—casts out all fear.

My heart is plugged into Him and into Life. I trust Him. I fear NOT.

Without fear, I have a lot more time and energy to love God and to love people—and shop.

In the last few verses of the book of Acts 28, Luke writes something astoundingly prophetic to his friend Theophilus:

30 And he (Paul) stayed two full years in his own rented quarters and was welcoming all who came to him, 31 preaching the kingdom of God and teaching concerning the Lord Jesus Christ with all openness, unhindered.

This is our mandate in the Church – To Welcome all. To preach the Kingdom of God—the pure gospel. And to share the life found in Jesus with all openness. Unhindered.

In the book of Matthew verses 13:45-46 we find the story of A Costly Pearl.

45 “Again, the kingdom of heaven is like a merchant seeking fine pearls, 46 and upon finding one pearl of great value, he went and sold all that he had and bought it.

Many interpret this story to mean that we are the merchants and upon finding the priceless gift of Jesus, we should go out and sell everything we have in order to follow Him. It’s not a bad concept. Jesus is worth everything we have.

But what if there is more? What do we possess, what do we own, that if we sold it, would ever be enough to purchase the entire field in which Jesus is found?  

What if instead, this is a story about our Good Father?

What if He is the merchant?

What if He paid the ultimate price – the price of redemption – in giving His own son/Himself/All He had to purchase us?

That would make us, that would make you and me the pearl of great price. For God SO loved the world….

It is time this becomes our anthem. So let it be. Amen.

“Alan & Leslie Chambers Interview on Steve Brown, Etc.”
by Dr. Steve Brown w/ Alan & Leslie Chambers

Sorry, listening to the audio on this website requires Flash support in your browser. You can try playing the MP3 file directly by clicking here.


DMy Exodus Book: From Fear to Gracer. Steve Brown, founder of Key Life Network, is a good friend who has stood with Leslie and me through the tests and trials we’ve walked through as leaders in the evangelical church. I am thankful for his wise counsel, encouragement, and friendship.

Leslie and I sat down with Steve and his cohosts, Zach Van Dyke, Justin Holcomb, and Erik Guzman last October to talk about our latest book, My Exodus: From FEAR to GRACE (Zondervan, 2015).

Click below to listen to the show. Please share your comments.



Easter and New Life!

WP Chain of Lakes CanalWelcome to spring, my friends. Living in Winter Park, Florida most often means the weather of spring isn’t so different than that of winter, nonetheless it is full of new sights, sounds, and fragrances. Spring is all about new life. I hope yours is full of just that.

Please CHECK OUT  the latest from Leslie and me:

Thanks so much for stopping by! Love to hear your thoughts in the comment section below. Or on social media:

The All New Muppet Show, One Million Moms, and Franklin Graham

Choosing discussion over battle is a good thing. Let's do better...

the muppets

Thursday I began seeing Facebook friends post comments attributed to Franklin Graham about the all-new prime time Muppets Show on ABC. I was surprised….that there was a new Muppet Show not that frontline Christian culture warriors like Franklin Graham and the American Family Association might be against such a show.

I try my best not to react to Facebook posts or articles. I try, rather, to respond after I have all of the facts. From time to time I fail. People notice, challenge me, assert that I am no longer a follower of Jesus Christ, and call me to repentance. I don’t mind being challenged. I need to be challenged and respectfully called out when I make a mistake like overreacting to something or someone. I am a public figure and I should take that responsibility very seriously. I also must repent publicly when I have made a mistake publicly.

I do repent about my hasty decision to call out Franklin Graham for his comments about The Muppet Show before I actually watched the debut. Repent, translated from the Greek word Metanoia, means to change your mind. It didn’t take me very long to change my mind about the rashness of my post. I was wrong to criticize anyone without knowing the full story. I am sorry for doing so.

Yesterday morning I signed into my Hulu account and watched all 21 minutes of The Muppets, which according to the American Family Association’s One Million Moms is “perverted”. Franklin Graham said this:

Tonight ABC is premiering a new “mature version” of the Muppets that reports say will cover a range of topics from sex to drugs to “interspecies relationships” with no subject being off limits. It sounds to me like the whole show should be off limits! Hollywood seems to be in a frenzy to see what new moral low they can reach in their programming. Their agenda is to promote sin to a younger and younger audience. I applaud the group One Million Moms for speaking out against this and urging parents to call on ABC to take it off the air. The Bible says, “Woe to those who call evil good and good evil.” That goes for Kermit the Frog as well!

I was prepared to eat my words. I was hoping, however, to be pleasantly surprised by The Muppets and to be able to introduce the new show to my kids. I won’t be doing either.

Starting with the latter, I found the show boring and the humor stupid rather than clever. I know my kids and they wouldn’t like the show. I’m glad because I didn’t like it and in order for them to watch, knowing there are adult-themed topics, I would have to watch it with them. I’d rather watch something truly mindless with them or something about which we can have an intelligent conversation.

With regard to the accusation that the show is a Hollywood plot to promote sin, I understand why parents who grew up on the show might not let their young children watch this new version. There are adult themes my two 10-year olds wouldn’t get or understand and ones I am not ready for them to get yet, but hasn’t that always been an issue in the world in which we live? Don’t we all shelter our kids from certain realities until we are either ready for the long conversation or until we believe they can make sense of it all? But, I didn’t find it any more perverse than Family Feud.

I am grateful for movie reviews, some watch groups, and others who share information about all sorts of things in an effort to keep kids safe. I think we should err on the side of caution in a number of areas. Leslie and I don’t consider it a burden when the parent of one of our kids’ friends calls prior to a play date or sleep over and asks us how we handle TV, video games, and junk food. But I also think, especially as Christians, we should be far more gracious to others and less sensitive to the things going on in the world around us, with which we might have objection.

If you don’t want your kids to watch certain shows, or TV in general, or listen to certain types of music, or eat junk food then, by all means, impose the restriction. But know this, your friends and neighbors, and very likely the person seated next to you in the pew on Sunday morning, isn’t necessarily going to agree with you or appreciate when you call their favorite show, band, or food evil. Doing so might insight hostility rather than encourage a discussion.

And, in my opinion, I’ll choose the discussion over the battle every time. My uninformed overreaction to Franklin Graham isn’t cause to question whether I follow Jesus Christ. Franklin Graham’s fear-based overreaction, in my opinion, to The Muppets doesn’t justify my screaming (because it was in all caps), “Dear Franklin Graham: PLEASE. RETIRE.”, on Facebook.

We can all do better. I’m game. You?

Kindness and Trust

Foundations worth standing for

mother son hands

Growing up, I lived a couple of houses down from a red headed boy named Bradley. In the picture my memory conjures of him, his face is sprinkled with a handful of freckles and his ear-to-ear smile is missing some of its Chiclet-like teeth. He was older than me, but I was bigger and stronger. I was the boss of him. Once, in an effort to bolster my superior position I bit Bradley – hard. My mom, who was ironing nearby, contemplated stepping in but instead waited and pretended not to see. She knew I needed to respect his humanity and he deserved the chance to earn that respect. And boy did he. He drew back his flaming red head and bit me with such force that the power struggle came to an abrupt and mutually respectful end. We played very nicely together after that and she was able to finish her ironing.

My kids are getting older and as much as I try to control their outward behavior, it is becoming utterly clear that I cannot control their inward motivations. As such, they occasionally fight over whether they should watch Pokémon or American Ninja Warriors and other such uber-important issues. Words like, “I promise that if you both treat each other kindly and in a way that earns the other persons trust, you will not be disappointed and I won’t have to lecture you anymore and the only consequences you will face will be positive ones,” are often floating around in our house. Kindness and trust are foundational elements. I long for my children to understand that if our choices are “trust builders” rather than “trust destroyers” and if those choices exhibit kindness, there’s a pretty good chance we will make wise choices.

Stepping back from stories like these, comparing them with how I treat those I’m in relationship with today, I marvel at God’s brilliant design. The very best of his creation was humankind. He ordered our lives. He set us up in families and then called himself Father. He gave us brothers and sisters with whom we had to share a room or sit next to in the backseat of the car on a ten-hour road trip to visit Aunt Betty. Then he called those of us who believe in him brothers and sisters in Christ.

My Washington Post OpEd on Gay Marriage

I once led an ex-gay ministry. Here’s why I now support people in gay marriages.

Last week I had the privilege of writing an opinion piece for the The Washington Post in light of the Supreme Court ruling on marriage. Here are the ending paragraphs from the article:

My prayers going forward will be for those who fear the results of the decision that was made today. Those who feel like they have lost their country and like evil is prevailing. As one who once felt that way I believe I can pray for them with great understanding and empathy. My prayer won’t be for them to change their mind on anything gay. My prayer will be for them to repent of fear.

Perfect love casts out all fear. Love never fails. I hope the 60 percent of Americans who won today will remember the 40 percent who feel as though they lost. This is truly an opportunity for the majority to do unto others better than they were once done unto. I believe this can happen because what I have found as a former conservative religious leader amongst the people I once opposed is love, acceptance, affirmation and friendship.

It’s time to end the war. It’s time for peace and rest. For Christians, I believe the Gospel demands it. There’s never been a better day for it than today.

Click here to read the full article. I look forward to your comments.

Alan Chambers: President Obama is right to try to end Reparative Therapy for minors (RNS COMMENTARY)

Religion_News_Service_-_Coverage_of_religion__ethics_and_spirituality_from_around_the_globeToday Religion News Service asked me to weigh in on Reparative Therapy for minors. It is titled, “Alan Chambers: President Obama is right to try to end ex-gay therapy (COMMENTARY).” From the article:

I got married in 1998, and for more than 17 years have found it easy to be faithful to my wife. I am more in love with her today than ever before and enjoy every part of our amazing marriage. But it took me 20 years, 12 of which I served as the president of Exodus International — the world’s largest so-called ex-gay ministry — to realize my story is just that: my story.

While I am thankful for the ministry I went to for support — there was no other place for gay Christians to go in 1991 to admit the truth — I am sorry that they and I prescribed a one-size-fits-all story for every gay and lesbian person. I’m sorry we preached an incomplete gospel and wrongly told LGBTQ people they could and should do more to be acceptable to God. Doing so was deeply hurtful and damaging to many who never experienced the kind of change we thought possible.

For too long, same-sex attraction has been categorized as sinful and in need of repairing. Such stigma has caused LGBTQ people crippling shame and fear. As a child I experienced and as an adult I perpetuated that stigma. I profoundly regret my support for and promotion of reparative therapy.

And that’s why I stand with President Obama in calling for a ban on this practice for minors and for greater measures to protect adults seeking this niche therapeutic intervention.

Click here to read the full article which shares about my journey and explains more of my reasoning behind my agreement with President Obama.

“Level Ground board member and Fast Company editor-at-large Jeff Chu’s exclusive interview with Alan Chambers.

From 2001 to 2013, Alan led Exodus International. Then, he oversaw the closure of the ministry. He and his wife Leslie are now focused on building relationships with the LGBT community and encouraging the global church to do the same.

Jeff and Alan discuss Alan’s journey, his time with Exodus, and what he believes it means and requires to establish trust with LGBT individuals.

Please support the ongoing work of Level Ground programming by making a donation at onlevelground.org/donate. Thank you!”

UPDATE: Speak. Love., The Chambers, and ZONDERVAN!


Today we are consolidating Speak. Love. into AlanChambers.org. In June 2013 when we closed Exodus International and embarked on this new season we decided to continue doing what we knew well, which was run an organization. However, about a month into the process someone asked me rather pointedly, “So, Alan, what’s your hiring policy going to be for Speak. Love.?” It was then I realized I didn’t want another organization, policies, procedures, or anything similar to what we had just left behind. Leslie and I wanted to be free to work and partner with whomever we chose regardless of sexual orientation, label, religion or lack there of.

Speak. Love. has been a great platform for discussions and bridge building. The many good goals, clear message, and original intent are being best expressed through Leslie’s and my speaking, consulting, and writing. It just makes sense from a stewardship angle to consolidate these online resources. Will the future hold a separate non-profit? Maybe. I haven’t yet perfected fortune telling. What I do know is the God given mission and vision of Speak. Love. is being lived out every day in Leslie and me as a team and will find a great online home here at AlanChambers.Org.

Please stay engaged as we ramp up our posts. The last year has been tremendously relaxing and purposeful for Leslie and me. One of our greatest accomplishments was writing our first book together. In July after many months of talking with publishers and deliberation we signed with Zondervan a division of Harper Collins. Our book, My Exodus: Leaving the Slavery of Religion, Loving the Image of God in Everyone is due out August 25, 2015.

Please stay in touch with us here at AlanChambers.org or via these social media platforms:


www.twitter.com/AlanMChambers or www.twitter.com/LeslieMChambers



For those who want to give towards the work of reconciliation we are doing, you may do so by clicking the donate button near the bottom of the sidebar.