Sexual Healing: Evangelicals Update Their Message to Gays – The Atlantic

Many thanks to Jennie Rothenberg and The Atlantic for an incredibly fair shake with this article. Some quotes from the introduction (they provided the linking.)

Thirty years ago, Alan Chambers was a Christ-loving 10-year-old with a terrible secret. He knew he was attracted to other boys. He also knew that the Bible called homosexuality an “abomination.” After nearly a decade of hiding his feelings (and his love of shopping and decorating) from family and pastors, he discovered a ministry called Exodus International. Today, Chambers is the president of Exodus and the author of the book Leaving Homosexuality. He oversees more than 260 ministries, spearheads large annual conferences, and is married to a woman.

Christians who consider themselves “ex-gays” have become a source of ridicule in popular culture. Although the evangelical leader Ted Haggard isn’t affiliated with Exodus, it didn’t help the cause when he was outed by a male prostitute he’d been frequenting for years — and then deemed by his pastors, after just three weeks of therapy, to be “completely heterosexual.” For many, though, these stories represent something deadly serious. The American Psychological Association warns that homosexuality is not a disorder, and that trying to “cure” it can lead to “intimacy avoidance, sexual dysfunction, depression, and suicidality.”

More recently, Chambers publicly rejected reparative therapy — a school of counseling that aims to make gay people straight. At the Gay Christian Network Conference in January of this year, Chambers told the audience that “99.9 percent of [Exodus participants] have not experienced a change in their orientation.” Around the same time, he pulled all reparative therapy books from the Exodus bookstore. His actions irked a number of therapists, including one marriage counselor, improbably named David Pickup, who argued that Exodus had “failed to understand and effectively deal with the actual root causes of homosexuality.”

As mentioned, the above quotes are from the first part of the interview. The second part is a direct back and forth conversation I had with Jennie Rothenberg. We cover a wide range of topics including my testimony, Exodus’ goals, gay teens, the Bible, monogamy vs. promiscuity and even Carrie Underwood’s stand on marriage.

I enjoyed the interview and hope you find the resulting article informative.

Alan served as the final president of Exodus International from 2001 to 2013 when together with a core team of leaders and board of directors he closed the organization and began making great strides towards building relationships with the LGBTQIA community and encouraging the global Church to do the same. With a goal to reduce fear, establish trust, and inspire hope on both sides for the sake of the Gospel, Alan and his wife, Leslie, spend their time being available to anyone who desires to talk. He has been featured on every major media outlet across the globe. Alan and Leslie’s first book together, My Exodus: From Fear to Grace (Zondervan, 2015) releases on September 29.

The Chambers spend the best part of their lives with their 10 year olds, Molly and Isaac, and the rest having conversations about all things gay with anyone and everyone over lunch in Winter Park, Florida or in other locations throughout the world.
Follow Alan and Leslie on Twitter: @AlanMChambers and @LeslieMChambers

Please note: I reserve the right to delete comments that are offensive or off-topic.

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One thought on “Sexual Healing: Evangelicals Update Their Message to Gays – The Atlantic

  1. Instead of saying the Gospels provides a cure for Homosexuality, We as believers should say the Christ provides freedom, freedom from control is past sins, freedom to live a holy life before God, freedom from a guilty conscience, and so on. 1 Corinthians 6 and Romans 6 lay the foundation for this truth. Apart from Christ we have no hope and apart for Christ there is no freedom.